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My insurance company have asked for a COD

It’s not uncommon for an insurance company to ask for a COD when your car is scrapped. Fortunately, when you use Car.co.uk’s simple car scrapping service, we can make sure you receive one.

COD stands for ‘certificate of destruction’ - an important DVLA certificate that is generated when an authorised dismantler begins scrapping your car. Here, we’ll explain a little more about what a COD is, how they’re created, and how you can make sure you receive one.

What is a COD?

A certificate of destruction is an official DVLA document that is received by an authorised treatment facility (ATF) when they begin scrapping your car. Creation of a DVLA certificate of destruction is done online; through a dedicated system that can only be accessed by scrap yards that meet with government ATF approval. 

A certificate of destruction confirms that the car in question is no longer registered to you, is officially off the road, and has been dismantled and recycled in line with strict environmental laws. 

Can all scrap yards provide a COD?

All government approved ATFs can provide you with a certificate of destruction when your car is scrapped – however, to be sure you’ll receive a COD, you need to be 100% certain that you’re dealing with an ATF.

This can sometimes be tricky, as unscrupulous traders might pretend to be a scrap yard - in an effort to make a quick profit by repairing and selling your car. Some will even produce a certificate similar to a COD – but without the important and official ‘certificate of destruction’ title. Instead, these will sometimes be called a ‘certificate of disposal’, a ‘confirmation of destruction’, or similar – however, only a DVLA issued COD will prove your car has been destroyed.

It’s not uncommon to see cars for sale when they should be issued with a certificate of destruction. If you need a COD, dealing with a trader who’s pretending to be a scrap yard means you won’t be able to fulfil your insurance company’s request – and you may be left open to legal consequences if there’s official paperwork outstanding and you’re still registered as the keeper of the car.

The simplest way to make sure you get a COD is to use our quick and easy car scrapping service. We only work with scrap yards who prove they meet with government ATF approval – so every one of our scrap partners will be able to issue you with a legitimate COD.

When should you receive a certificate of destruction form?

When you receive your copy of the COD will depend on how quickly the ATF handling your car actually begins the scrapping and recycling process through their DVLA certificate of destruction online login. In some cases, this will occur almost immediately – and a copy of the DVLA issued COD can be forwarded to you soon after.

In some cases, officially starting the scrapping and recycling process might take a little longer – but don’t worry, if you need a COD quickly, simply let us know when we provide a quote for your car – and we’ll make sure the ATF is aware of the urgency.

How can you make sure you get a COD?

It is the legal responsibility of the ATF handling your car to issue you with a copy of the COD – but as many of our ATFs are processing hundreds of scrap cars every week, there’s a slight possibility that a COD might be overlooked.

To be absolutely certain that you receive your COD, please let us know that you require a copy when we provide a quote for your car. That way, we’ll make sure the ATF is made aware – and they’ll ensure a copy is sent to you shortly after the scrapping process begins. 

What should you do with your certificate of destruction?

If your insurance company have requested a copy, you should send your COD on to them so that they can update their records. When your insurance company are satisfied, you should keep your COD on file – as proof that you are no longer responsible for the vehicle.

Other related FAQs

Looking for more related content to this? We’ve picked a selection of related topics that you may find helpful

A Certificate of Destruction (COD) is a document confirming your car has been disposed of. The certificate is created by the DVLA and sent to the scrap yard that dismantles your vehicle. A copy will be forwarded to you; for you to keep on record or send to your insurance company if requested.

It’s your legal responsibility to let the DVLA know you’re scrapping your car. The easiest way to do this is by using Section 9 of the V5C log book document (or section 4 on V5Cs issued after April 2019) – which your collection driver will be happy to help with.

A waste carrier’s licence is a registration you need if you move any kind of waste product – scrap cars included. At Car.co.uk, each of our partner dismantlers appears on this register, so you can be confident your vehicle will be handled in line with Environment Agency standards.

That’s okay if you don't have your V5C; we can scrap your vehicle without it. However, the person who collects your car will need to see proof of ID and address – and you’ll need to make sure you inform the DVLA that your car has been transferred.

To scrap your car, you’ll need to provide photo ID and proof of address. While not essential, if you have your V5C registration document, this may simplify the process. You’ll also require a Certificate of Destruction afterwards.

You should use the registration document to let the DVLA know you’ve sold your car to a dismantler. You can do this by completing and returning section 9 of the form – or, on V5Cs issued after April 2019; section 4.

If you’ve lost your V5 registration document, sometimes referred to as a title, you can still scrap your car, but you’ll need to inform the DVLA by post after your car’s been successfully scrapped with certain details of the transaction.

As part of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013, it is a legal requirement for a scrap metal dealer to verify the full name and address of someone who is handing scrap metal over to them.